23
Jul 2008
Star Wars Video Game Cartridge
Archivado en Merchandising, Videojuegos por Nexus7 a las 9:37 am | 1 Comentario »


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Vera Bradley sale said:

Fashion perpetuates the image of the slender woman being the ideal feminine and can sometimes have significantly detrimental effects. Due to the mass production of clothing, it has become easier for the fashion industry to encourage women to be slender (Macdonald, 1995, p208). Many of the most fashionable garments are not made larger than a woman’s Australian size fourteen. This encourages women to diet and exercise in order to lose weight, a trend also encouraged by the many advertisements involving slender women. One disturbing result of society’s fascination with being thin has been the rise in eating disorders, including anorexia (Macdonald, 1995, p208). In Australia’s November 2004 issue of Cosmopolitan an article was run entitled ‘Anorexia for Sale’. This article discussed Mary Kate Olson, a well known actress, and her public struggle with Anorexia Nervosa. Images of Olsen and other famous women who appear to be unhealthily thin, such a Kate Moss, have been used on websites known as ‘pro ana’ sites, that is, websites supporting anorexia as a ‘lifestyle choice’ as opposed to an illness (Percival, 2004, p62). Many of these sites have begun to sell ‘ana bracelets’ and ‘ana necklaces’ which are a means of identifying other anorexics and which serve as a reminder not to eat. This jewellery has proven quite popular within the anorexic community (Percival, 2004, p62). This is an extreme example of fashion (or in this case accessories) being used to specifically propagate the idea of being thin. On the other hand clothing can also be used to raise awareness of eating disorders and encourage women not to go so far. T shirts with the slogan ‘Save Mary Kate’ and a drawing of her emaciated figure were released with just this intention (Percival, 2004, p62). Released when Mary Kate began her rehabilitation, the emaciated drawing on the t shirts is far from attractive and draws attention to her bones and the unnaturalness of being so thin. The words ‘Save Mary Kate’ could be read in one of two ways however, they could refer to the fact that she is need of help, thus constructing her as a victim, or they could be referring to the desirability of her image and a wish that she remain so thin, thus the implication could be ‘Save Mary Kate from the rehabilitation clinic’. This second reading is supported by the image itself, in which she is smiling and returning the gaze of the viewer. This subverts the intended message that she is a victim.


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